Photographers With a Photographic [Eidetic] Memory - pics by darah - Darah Soria

Photographers With "Photographic" [Eidetic] Memories

photographic memory vs eidetic memory

Okay, so having a "Photographic Memory" isn't really a thing. Only one person has ever been tested/reported to truly have one, and she ultimately married the scientist who believed that she had one. The results couldn't even be reproduced.

An "Editetic Memory", on the other hand, is a phenomenal occurrence which usually exists in children (about 2-10%), and research has made it clear that polymorphisms of a specific protein in our DNA called PKCA, which is responsible for how our memories are stored. Everyone has this, however there is a variant which is the driver of visual memory: "rs4790904"; and three sub-types of it named AA, AG and GG.

Refugees who survived the Rwandan massacres were studied, and in the study it was discovered the the AA sub-type was highly more likely to exist in individuals who were exhibiting the characteristics associated with PTSD. [Universty of Basel; Switzerland]

AA AND THE LINK TO YOUR PAST

I won't go on a long diatribe about my childhood, but let's say that it was interesting. A lot of people tell me that my life was "hard", and one of my favorite compliments so far has been from people saying that I am "inspiring." Maybe someday I'll get into it.

From the aforementioned research, it was concluded that while the AA variant was found to be responsible for vividity in happy memories, it is equally responsible for complete recall of painful or traumatizing memories. So while I had to recently go over some extremely negative childhood memories, I can also tell you, in fantastic detail, about all of the positive moments I experienced in childhood. Through this research it was subsequently discovered that children with ADHD were highly likely to share nice things with others at the expense of a far higher likelihood of Addiction and/or promiscuity. For me personally, this explains a lot! Thanks, science.

THE FINER DETAILS IN LIFE

So what I find interesting about this is that while I was in therapy, I was asked a lot of questions about my childhood. When I ask others about theirs - even my siblings - theirs are far different. My memory begins at around the age of 3, and I can tell you exactly where every single house was that my biological mother lived in. I can even describe the layout of several of them precisely.
How I think this affects my work
So basically in having "an eye for detail", what I really think it is, is memory that determines my ability to create photos. When I was remembering moments from being a child, I hadn't actually considered that I may have subconsciously chosen which parts to remember. It's a survival skill, really, and as I had learned before it has direct links to intelligence and the ability to socialize. Remembering in great detail what places or people to avoid is absolutely a necessary skill.

I hear it a lot, "Wow, Rae! You really DO notice interesting things! Things I never would have thought of!" Like the little swirl on the back of a newborn baby's head, or the genetic imprint of wrinkles on their tiny feet... Or the way a newly engaged couple looks at each other vs. a couple that's two kids and ten years into their marriage.

The small things in life...

THE FINER DETAILS IN LIFE

So what I find interesting about this is that while I was in therapy, I was asked a lot of questions about my childhood. When I ask others about theirs - even my siblings - theirs are far different. My memory begins at around the age of 3, and I can tell you exactly where every single house was that my biological mother lived in. I can even describe the layout of several of them precisely.
How I think this affects my work
So basically in having "an eye for detail", what I really think it is, is memory that determines my ability to create photos. When I was remembering moments from being a child, I hadn't actually considered that I may have subconsciously chosen which parts to remember. It's a survival skill, really, and as I had learned before it has direct links to intelligence and the ability to socialize. Remembering in great detail what places or people to avoid is absolutely a necessary skill.

I hear it a lot, "Wow, Rae! You really DO notice interesting things! Things I never would have thought of!" Like the little swirl on the back of a newborn baby's head, or the genetic imprint of wrinkles on their tiny feet... Or the way a newly engaged couple looks at each other vs. a couple that's two kids and ten years into their marriage. Or in the picture above - my son's gorgeously long eyelashes.

The small things in life...


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